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Decoding mental imagery from electroencephalography (EEG) with Brain-Computer Interface Technology

Date Wednesday 09 Oct 2019
Time 17:00 - for a 17:30 start
Free admission
Speaker

Professor Damien Coyle

About the speaker

Damien Coyle, Professor of Neurotechnology, is currently Director of the Intelligent Systems Research Centre and Research Director in the School of Computing, Engineering and Intelligent Systems at Ulster University. He has published research papers in areas such as computational intelligence/AI, bio-signal processing, computational neuroscience, neuroimaging, neurotechnology and brain-computer interface (BCI) applications and has won a number of prestigious international awards for his research including the IEEE Computational Intelligence Society (CIS) Outstanding Doctoral Dissertation Award and the International Neural Network Society (INNS) Young Investigator of the Year Award.

Professor Coyle is also CEO of NeuroCONCISE Ltd, the Ulster University spinout company he founded in 2016 to build wearable, AI-enabled neurotechnology that non-invasively measures and translates brainwaves into control signals to enable people to interact with technology and communicate without moving. In 2018 NeuroCONCISE Ltd was winner of the IET and E&T Innovation of the Year Award.

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Location Room N310, RGU, Sir Ian Wood Building, Garthdee Road, Aberdeen, AB10 7GJ
Car parking is available on site during the evening.
Abstract

Research in the field of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) and neurotechnology has proven that electrical signals in the brain, modulated intentionally by mental imagery, can relay information directly to a computer, where it is translated by intelligent algorithms (some inspired by the brain’s neural networks) into control signals that enable communication and control without movement. This talk will show that people with restricted abilities resulting from disease or injury may benefit from this technology, for example, those who have prolonged disorders of consciousness or locked-in syndrome following traumatic brain injury.

Neural activity can be modulated by many kinds of mental imagery e.g.: classical motor imagery BCIs distinguish between imagined hand/arm movements. This presentation will show recent results in decoding imagined three-dimensional limb movements, imagined primitive shapes, emotion inducing imagery and silent speech from EEG. The presentation will attempt to address the question is it feasible to expect high and robust performance with these types of imagery in EEG-based BCIs and will highlight results which indicate user proficiency in BCI control is a matter of training time, machine learning/AI ability, and application of the technology.

Training over multiple sessions is certainly key to learning how to modulate brain activity via a motor imagery and this involves the collection of large dataset from multiple users. An AI-enabled wearable neurotechnology and cloud technologies platform that can enable this and is capable of streaming, storing, visualising and analysing big brain data in real-time from multiple parallel users from any location will also be described in this talk.


BCS Aberdeen AGM 2019 followed by a talk on "Bots, Burnout and Blame"

Date Wednesday 11 Sep 2019
Time 18:00 - for a 18:30 start
Free admission
Speaker

Martin Bellringer (Meaningbit LTD)

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Location Room N204, RGU, Sir Ian Wood Building, Garthdee Road, Aberdeen, AB10 7GJ
Car parking is available on site during the evening.
Abstract

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

Our AGM is an important opportunity to influence plans for future talks and events and also to JOIN THE COMMITTEE. We have had a number of retirals and are particularly keen to recruit new members from an industrial background.

If you wish to join us please COME EARLY and make yourself known to Jon Tyler, Norman Bain or Peter Gray during the coffee period from 6 PM. We are especially keen to recruit a YOUNG PROFESSIONAL, recently started working in IT.

Following our short AGM, Peter Gray will introduce extracts from the "Bots, Burnout and Blame" talk given to the Edinburgh branch by Martin Bellringer, using them as discussion starters.